How to locally strengthen areas

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ccrome
Posts: 410
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2013 5:37 pm

How to locally strengthen areas

Postby ccrome » Sun Nov 17, 2013 11:33 am

Hi all,
Is there any way to locally strengthen areas that need it, while leaving infill sparse around other areas?

For example, I may want an area around a screw to be 100% infill so it can take the force of the screw, but have the rest of the part at 25% infill.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
-Caleb

Cohbra11
Posts: 77
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:22 am

Re: How to locally strengthen areas

Postby Cohbra11 » Mon Nov 18, 2013 2:33 am

I'm not aware of any way to do it, but I have thought about it many times wishing there were a way to do just that.

jd_3d
Posts: 629
Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2012 12:30 pm

Re: How to locally strengthen areas

Postby jd_3d » Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:11 am

Yeah, there's really only 3 ways I've dealt with it:

1) Fully model the structure the way you want (i.e., hollow it) and print with 100% fill. This is what you'd have to do if you got it printed a places like shapeways, etc.

2) Use many perimeters/loops as that will help to strengthen local areas.

3) The Simplify 3d slicer has a cool feature where you can have different settings at any layer height range, so if you want 100% fill from 20mm-30mm in height of the model you can set that up. That's another way to locally strengthen areas.

ccrome
Posts: 410
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2013 5:37 pm

Re: How to locally strengthen areas

Postby ccrome » Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:36 am

What slicers handle multiple colors?

Can you create a '2 color' model, where each color gets different fill settings? This will be 2 perfectly matched up STL files I assume. Then have the slicer slice model 1 with normal settings on extruder 1, and model 2 with solid settings on extruder 2? Then tell the software (or have a little post-processor) that makes extruder 1 and extruder 2 the same physically extruder?

-Caleb

dsp39
Posts: 96
Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2013 9:25 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: How to locally strengthen areas

Postby dsp39 » Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:49 pm

Good thinking on the use of 'two colors.' I can't speak to that.

One thing I've done with success is to force the slicer to put 'perimeters' where I want extra strength. For the violin I printed, I need as much stiffness as I can get down the length of the instrument to resist bending from the strings. I quickly learned that I had to use a metal truss rod, but by cutting a cylinder down the length of the instrument, I have a section of structural, dense fill formed by those perimeters. Does that make sense?

ccrome
Posts: 410
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2013 5:37 pm

Re: How to locally strengthen areas

Postby ccrome » Fri Dec 13, 2013 1:37 pm

Yeah, I thought of putting in some less-than-extrusion-width slots to see if that would essentially make more loops. but the dual extruder trick is really what I want.

-C

LaserGnomes
Posts: 1058
Joined: Thu Dec 06, 2012 10:15 pm

Re: How to locally strengthen areas

Postby LaserGnomes » Sat Dec 14, 2013 2:04 pm

We used advanced versions of KissSlicer to manage up to 2 extruders.
We successfully got this to work and it would not work for your intentions.

The slicers as they are give you an option to print the object in EX0 and the support/infill (selectable) in EX1/EX2.

Sounds like "color" varied slicer is your option.

We just design it entirely. If it's not designed that way we just add additional internal structure so the loops consider it. We often do this trick to make "studs" internally for what will be area that will be Tapped out for a screw or whatever. Nice trick to avoid printing crappy holes.

-1 cent.

-LG

MagnetHead
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2016 12:54 am

Re: How to locally strengthen areas

Postby MagnetHead » Wed Mar 30, 2016 1:21 am

I specifically purchased a printer to explore making internal structures that have varying levels of density and structural strength throughout an object. To do this it took making my own 3d lattices from scratch. The lattices are based on octahedral geometry. The edges of the octahedrons making the lattice are made out of cylinders. By varying the cylinders diameters and lengths it's easy to gain total control over how strong different areas of the lattice are. I also use the methodology known as voxels, I'm not talking about voxels that are computerized, smart, or robotic just geometric voxels. I have so far developed three different geometries that all complement octahedral lattices. By picking and placing these different geometries/voxels throughout the lattice I have another way to make certain locations stronger than other areas.

So basically by changing the diameter and lengths of cylinders making the lattice plus using the voxel approach I have total control over how strong or weak any location of the object is, any location! It's a little involved but if you're serious about having this level of control you can accomplish it simply by designing your internal structures from scratch, instead of having a slicing program do it for you.

Of course doing this makes infill settings totally obsolete and you need to set them to 100% and leave it on that setting. Basically forget there ever was a setting for infill. lol :)

"jd_3d" wrote "Yeah, there's really only 3 ways I've dealt with it:

1) Fully model the structure the way you want (i.e., hollow it) and print with 100% fill. This is what you'd have to do if you got it printed a places like shapeways, etc."

This is exactly what I just described doing.

Link is for a octahedral lattice: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/AbtDpG1bp ... Pq9w4GG7Y/

Link is for example of 3d lattice with thickness gradient:
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/422705115005627887/

Link is showing one of the three complementary geometries that I figured out how to model. Each concave cubical geometry is treated as a geometric voxel(the lattices I make are much smaller and contain hundreds of each concave cube geometry combined with other geometries):
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/422705115006335280/

I hope all this helps you to dream up your own custom internal structures. Lattices are very fun to learn how to design and hone your own special technique. The design possibilities are truly endless!

Elijah
Site Admin
Posts: 767
Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2012 6:33 pm

Re: How to locally strengthen areas

Postby Elijah » Fri Apr 01, 2016 4:48 pm

That's totally awesome!
Elijah Post
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